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EC-47 Paver Project

Started by Joystick, November 27, 2019, 08:24:45 am

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Joystick

A couple of us in the club were involved with the EC-47 project. Joe just sent me this information.

Take a peek at the paver webpage. We will be announcing the opening of the ordering process very soon after Thanksgiving.

http://www.vietnam50thcpp.com/pavers
CHECK SIX

Signed: Steve Rogers (As far as you know)

Nothing is foolproof to a sufficiently talented fool. For Herb: All facts have not been personally verified by me for accuracy. Use them at your own risk.

Lane C.

In case you are wondering what an EC-47 is, or was, the EC-47 was an airborne listening post, or put another way, a spy plane. The back of the plane was staffed with linguists and the 2 pilots and flight engineer were restricted from entering that area during a mission. The aircraft exterior bristled with antennas on the top and bottom of the wings and fuselage, tuned for listening on many different frequencies of enemy transmissions.

It was basically a sitting duck, slowly flying around and over enemy territory, but one thing that saved it was that it looked almost identical to the AC-47 gunship "Puff." The enemy troops were fairly terrified to shoot at the EC-47 thinking it was Puff coming to pay them a visit. Puff had made a name for himself and once he opened fire on a position, virtually nothing was left standing, or alive.

I worked for 15 years with a USAF pilot who flew the EC-47 out of Phu Cat in 1969 and I heard many accounts of the Electric Goon from him. Contrary to the usual respect that Charlie had for the C-47's, one day his plane took a direct hit by AAA on the tip of the left wing. About 8 feet of that wing simply was gone in a moment. He immediately turned for home announcing that the sortie was over. The guys in back radio'd him that they were not done yet, and he replied, "You are now. We are RTB!"
Current Build = F6F TF 86" Hellcat
Just Finished = Meister 118" A6M3 Model 22 Zero
Future Build = BUSA 1/4 Fokker DVII

Joystick

They got over their fear of shooting at it when I was flying. We got hit several times.
CHECK SIX

Signed: Steve Rogers (As far as you know)

Nothing is foolproof to a sufficiently talented fool. For Herb: All facts have not been personally verified by me for accuracy. Use them at your own risk.

Lane C.

They may have finally gotten the word that NOT ALL of the C-47's were gunships! ha. Besides that, some guys just like to see if they can hit a moving target! People are the same all over.
Current Build = F6F TF 86" Hellcat
Just Finished = Meister 118" A6M3 Model 22 Zero
Future Build = BUSA 1/4 Fokker DVII

Joystick

Here is one of several that I used to fly on.

They had over a million dollars worth of radio receivers on the plane so they could listen in on enemy radio transmissions and do "direction finding" in order to report the exact position to headquarters and they would call in a B-52 "Arc Light" bombing strike which was "carpet bombing" the area.

They also had one of the most accurate navigation systems that was available at the time. It actually counted inches as the plane flew.

I only flew on the ones that had bad navigation problems. When they weren't sure where they were it was easy to fly over the enemy gun positions and take a lot of hits. My job was to fix the navigation system to correct the errors so the planes could fly around the known gun positions.

One thing that made the missions really dangerous was the requirement to update the navigation system using an optical scope in the bottom of the plane. They had to fly directly over known locations, called "Bench Marks", on the ground. Most of those were surveyed by Australians back in the 1950's. The planes had to fly straight and level for several minutes in order to get a fix. The enemy loved that and they would set up guns near the bench marks. The only way to reduce the risk was to approach the bench marks at a variety of headings. No heading, altitude or airspeed changes were allowed during the update runs.

Most missions were 7 hours and were flown at or below 5,000 feet, or below the clouds, which made the planes easy to see. Airsickness was very common for the crew due to the rough air at that altitude.

These planes were still flying missions after the war was over even though Nixon said there were no more American planes flying over the area.

Exciting times.
CHECK SIX

Signed: Steve Rogers (As far as you know)

Nothing is foolproof to a sufficiently talented fool. For Herb: All facts have not been personally verified by me for accuracy. Use them at your own risk.

Lane C.

They had a nose radar which made it nice to fly around storms.
Current Build = F6F TF 86" Hellcat
Just Finished = Meister 118" A6M3 Model 22 Zero
Future Build = BUSA 1/4 Fokker DVII

Joystick

That was a great little radar. I can't remember much about it because I didn't need to work on it much. Seems like it was made by Bendix.

One of the Air Force Generals at Scott AFB loved it so much he had one installed on his T-28. It was not authorized according to the Table of Allowance for that plane and I had to write up the justification for it and get it approved so he could keep it. That was a lot of work, but it was way easier than telling a general that he had to remove his radar.
CHECK SIX

Signed: Steve Rogers (As far as you know)

Nothing is foolproof to a sufficiently talented fool. For Herb: All facts have not been personally verified by me for accuracy. Use them at your own risk.